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Tehran is the capital of Iran and Tehran Province. With a population of about 8,300,000 and about 14 million metropolitan area, it is Iran's largest city and urban area, and one of the largest cities in Western Asia.
In the 20th and 21st centuries, Tehran has been the subject to mass migration of people from all around Iran. The city is home to many historic mosques, churches, synagogues and Zoroastrian fire temples. Contemporary Tehran is a modern city featuring many structures, of which the Azadi (Freedom) Tower and the Milad Tower have come to be symbols of Tehran itself. Tehran is ranked 29th in the world by the population of its metropolitan area.Throughout Iran's history, the capital has been moved many times, and Tehran is the 32nd national capital of Iran although it has been Iran's capital for
about 220 years. Persian is spoken by the people and is understandable by roughly 98% of the population.
The majority of people in Tehran identify themselves as Persians.

The Saadabad Palace is a palace built by the Pahlavi dynasty of Iran in the Shemiran area of Tehran.
The complex was first inhabited by Qajar monarchs and royal family in the 19th century. After an expansion of the compounds, Reza Shah lived there in the 1920s. And his son, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi moved there in the 1970s.
After the Iranian Revolution, the complex became a museum. However, the current presidential palace is located adjacent to the Sa'd Abad compound.
Currently, parts of the Saadabad Palace compound are museums, in which visitors can roam through and look at the rich history of Iran, and some parts of the compound are used by the Iranian Cultural Heritage Organization which is responsible for most of the artifacts, locations, and cultural aspects of Iran. Also, the palace named "Kakhe malakeye madar" nowadays belongs to the presidency organization, and hosts the president's foreign guests.

Located in Tehran, beside Laleh Park, and founded in 1976, the Carpet Museum of Iran exhibits a variety of Persian carpets from all over Iran, dating from 18th century to present.
The museum's exhibition hall occupies 3,400 square meters (10,200 ft²) and its library contains 7,000 books.
The perforated structure around the museum's exterior is designed both to resemble a carpet loom, and to cast shade on the exterior walls, reducing the impact of the hot summer sun on the interior temperature.

The Imperial crown jewels of Iran include several elaborate crowns and decorative thrones, thirty tiaras, and numerous aigrettes, a dozen bejewelled swords and shields, a vast number of unset precious gems, numerous plates and other dining services cast in precious metals and encrusted with gems, and several other more unusual items (such as a large golden globe with the continents made of emeralds and the latitudes and longitudes marked in diamonds) collected by the Iranian monarchy from the 16th century (Safavid dynasty) on.

The collection is housed at The Treasury of National Jewels (the official name) but is known colloquially as the Jewellery Museum. It is situated inside the Central Bank of the Islamic Republic of Iran on Tehran's Ferdowsi Avenue.
The Imperial crown jewels of Iran are the largest set of displayed jewels in the world in state ownership in one location.

The National Museum of Iran is the combination of two museums, the old Muze-ye Irân-e Bâstân ("Archaeological Museum of Iran", a break, Sasanian revival building designed by André Godard and inaugurated in 1937), and the modernistic white travertine National Arts Museum inaugurated in 1972. The second structure, built on the grassy grounds of the old Archaeological Museum, went through quite a few, and hasty changes of the interior, and was still being remodeled when the Islamic Revolution swept the country in 1979.
While the old museum always had a clear mandate to show archaeological relics (to also include some rare medieval textiles and rug pieces), the new museum began its life by featuring the exquisite Amlash pottery from the prehistoric Caspian Sea regions of Iran. This was followed by some modern arts, and the numerous gutting and remodeling of the interior. It was only after the Islamic Revolution than the new building was appended to the old, to form the "National Museum of Iran".

Shemshak is the second largest ski area in Iran after Dizin and came into operation in 1958. It includes two ski lifts, three dish teleskis and two Hammer teleskis. The slopes lie at an altitude of 2550m to 3050m above sea level. The resort includes two main slopes each with a chair lift that apex at the top and several lifts.There are also lighting facilities for night skiing.

Shemshak has classically catered to more advanced skiers while Dizin has drawn beginner, intermediate and advanced skiers. The slopes are quite steep and many of the runs are mogul runs.
Shemshak is conveniently situated just about 55 minutes drive from Tehran.