This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

Isfahan is located on the main north-south and east-west routes crossing Iran, and was once one of the largest cities in the world. It flourished from 1050 to 1722, particularly in the 16th century under the Safavid dynasty, when it became the capital of Persia for the second time in its history. Even today, the city retains much of its past glory. It is famous for its Islamic architecture, with many beautiful boulevards, covered bridges, palaces, mosques, and minarets.
This led to the Persian proverb "Esfahan nesf-e jahan ast" (Isfahan is half of the world).

Naqsh-e Jahan Square ,trans: "Image of the World Square", known as Imam Square, formerly known as Shah Square, is a square situated at the center of Isfahan city, Iran.
Constructed between 1598 and 1629, it is now an important historical site, and one of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. It is 160 meters wide by 508 meters long (an area of 89,600 m2). The square is surrounded by buildings from the Safavid era. The Shah Mosque is situated on the south side of this square. On the west side is the Ali Qapu Palace. Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque is situated on the eastern side of this square and the northern side opens into the Isfahan Grand Bazaar. Today, Namaaz-e Jom'eh (the Muslim Friday prayer) is held in the Shah Mosque. The square is depicted on the reverse of the Iranian 20,000 rials banknote.

The Bakhtiari are a southwestern Lurishtribe. They speak the Bakhtiari dialect, a southwestern Iranian dialect, belonging to the Luri language.
A small percentage of Bakhtiari are still nomadic pastoralists, migrating between summer quarters and winter quarters.
Bakhtiaris primarily inhabit in Chahar Mahaal and Bakhtiari and parts of the provinces of Lorestan, Khuzestan, and Isfahan.

Ali Qapu is a grand palace in Isfahan, Iran.It is located on the western side of the Naqsh-e Jahan Square opposite to Sheikh lotf allah mosque, and had been originally designed as a vast portal. It is forty-eight meters high and there are seven floors, each accessible by a difficult spiral staircase. In the sixth floor music room, deep circular niches are found in the walls,having not only aesthetic value, but also acoustic.
The name Ali Qapu, from Arabic Ali, "Imperial or Great", and Turkic Qapu meaning "gate", was given to this place as it was right at the entrance to the Safavid palaces which stretched from the Maidan Naqsh-i-Jahan to the Chahar Bagh Boulevard. The building, another wonderful Safavid edifice, was built by decree of Shah Abbas the Great in the early seventeenth century.It was here that the great monarch used to entertain noble visitors, and foreign ambassadors. Shah Abbas,here for  the first time celebrated the Nowruz (New Year's Day) of 1006 AH / 1597 C.E

Vank Cathedral was one of the first churches to be established in the city's Jolfa district by Armenian deportees settled by Shah Abbas I after the Ottoman War of 1603-1605. The varying fortunes and independence of this suburb across the Zayandeh rood and its eclectic mix of European missionaries, mercenaries and travelers can be traced almost chronologically in the cathedral's combination of building styles and contrasts in its external and internal architectural treatment.

Imam Mosque, formerly known as Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan, Iran standing in south side of Naghsh-i-Jahan Square.
Built during the Safavid period, it is an excellent example of Islamic architecture of Iran, and regarded as one of the masterpieces of Persian Architecture. The Shah Mosque of Esfahan is one of the everlasting masterpieces of architecture in Iran. It is registered, along with the Naghsh-i-Jahan Square, as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Its construction began in 1611, and its splendor is mainly due to the beauty of its seven-colour mosaic tiles and calligraphic inscriptions.

Chehel Sotoun (also Chihil Sutun or Chehel Sotoon, literally: “Forty Columns”) is a pavilion in the middle of a park at the far end of a long pool, in Isfahan, Iran, built by Shah Abbas II to be used for his entertain ment and receptions. In this palace, Shah Abbas II and his successors would receive dignitaries and ambassadors, either on the terrace or in one of the stately reception halls.
The name, meaning "Forty Columns" in Persian, was inspired by the twenty slender wooden columns supporting the entrance pavilion,which, when reflected in the waters of the fountain, are said to appear to be forty.

Siosepol or Siose Bridge(which means 33 Bridge or the Bridge of 33 Arches), also called the Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge, is one of the eleven bridges of Isfahan, Iran. It is highly ranked as being one of the most famous examples of Safavid bridge design.
Commissioned in 1602 by Shah Abbas I from his chancellor Allahverdi Khan Undiladze, an Iranian ethnic Georgian, it consists of two rows of 33 arches. There is a larger base plank at the start of the bridge where the Zayandeh River flows under it, supporting a tea house.